Archive | June 2014

The fleece(s) has arrived.


DSCF1913

I have now received the fleece(s) I was promised and there are some of different types. The Polworth looked the dirtiest so I have started with that one. Picture above showed how it arrived.

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

  P0lwarth is a breed of sheep that was developed in Victoria (Australia) during 1880. They were of one-quarter Lincoln and three-quarters Merinobloodlines. They are large, predominantly polled sheep with long, soft, quite fine wool and produce good meat carcases. They were developed in an attempt to extend the grazing territory of sheep because the Merino was found lacking in hardiness in this respect.[1] A dual-purpose (meat and wool) breed with a major emphasis on wool production.[2]

Characteristics

Mature ewes weigh 50 to 60 kg (110 to 130 lb) and mature rams weigh 66 to 80 kg (146 to 176 lb). Ewes are excellent prime lamb mothers producing lambs that have good lean carcases. The high yielding fleeces weigh an average six to seven kilograms, with a fibre diameter of 23 to 25 microns[3] (58–60s).[2][4][5]

The Polwarth Sheepbreeders’ Association of Australia was formed in 1918 and the studbook closed in 1948.

Polwarths are now mostly found in the higher rainfall regions of south-eastern Australia that have improved pastures. Polwarths have been exported into many countries, including South America where they are known as Ideals.[5]

Polworth sheep Polworth Sheep

First I washed it, three times. Then after a thorough rinse, I put it out in the sunshine to dry.

 

DSCF1898

Larry bought me some carding combs so I could stroke the fleece into submission!

DSCF1915

It’s important to keep one comb for the left hand and the other for the right. So I marked them to make sure I didn’t get them mixed up.

DSCF1916

When the fleece was washed, dried and combed, it looked like this. I have stored it and can’t wait to try spinning with it soon. It looks like a cloud of happiness to me 🙂

DSCF1914

 

I’ll come back and show you as soon as I start spinning.

Oma

Spinning and Knitting Project finished.


DSCF1908

 

The above four yarns were spun by me during the last year.  Question was: what to do with them when they are finished? Answer: find a pattern that you like and adapt it.  Easier said than done.

Then I saw this pattern in an old ‘People’s Friend’ magazine. I thought it would be just right. It was just right for someone short-waisted, like me, and lots of opportunities for using more than one colourway.

My spun-off merino knits up like Aran so knitting with 5mm (u.k. needles) I began.

DSCF1911

 

…and here is the finished result. I’m pleased with it.  It’s not at all itchy and very comfortable to wear.

DSCF1903

 

The colour panel at the back breaks up the vast expanse of lavender yarn and compliments the front panels.

DSCF1904

I like the way it sticks out at the front.

DSCF1902

 

 

Now on to my next project, but first I need to make something with the left-over yarn from this one. Any ideas?

 

Oma

 

My English Garden in June 2014


DSCF1889

These daisies come up every year and sometimes are just a little too prolific, but I like things I can get a lot of so I put up! with the profusion. Can you see the bee on one of the flowers?  Last year it was hover flies and I got stung twice on the arm on two separate occasions. I’m hoping that won’t happen again this year because I’m allergic to stings and bites and suffer miserably.

Here is the hanging basket just outside my back door. The nasturtiums aren’t flowering yet, but they will be soon I think. Just as soon as we get some sunshine.

DSCF1870

On Sunday last, Larry cooked a tasty barbecue. We had steak and lamb chops. Next time I fancy doing kebabs of some sort so here he is making an addition to the grill to cook kebabs on. Does anyone have any good recipes for kebabs? I’m new to barbecues and could do with some help please.

DSCF1871

Jim’s runner beans are all up, even the ones in the pots. Last year was a disaster to start with and he had to replant the lot. Then in the second coming (so to speak), they did so well that he had the best year for runner beans ever.

DSCF1873

Here the ferns and in front the tomatoe plants. To the right is our camellia.

DSCF1875

We had lots of beautiful clematis flowers this year. This one is called ‘The President’.

DSCF1878

Last year I took care to spread around lots of the white nigella plants. We are rewarded this summer with some lovely specimens.  Common name is ‘Love in a mist’. So romantic, don’t you think?

DSCF1880

The sweet williams are just starting to flower.

DSCF1884

and we have lots of bright red poppies.

DSCF1886

DSCF1888

Lots of joy in the garden isn’t there.

Oma